Food

Interpreting and Executing Two Briefs

In my last Fstoppers post, I shared an interesting video called Briefly, which discussed how and why a company or advertising agency might approach developing or executing a creative brief.

Remember, the brief is the information that you receive going into an assignment and client relationship. It can serve as your guide to understand what your client aspires to accomplish; a jumping off point to get your own mind working to produce concepts and content ideas. Some briefs are short; some briefs are lengthy and detailed. Some are open for interpretation; others seem rigid and strict.

Go Behind the Scenes of My Food Photoshoot

The landscape of all businesses looks different, and store after store keeps closing because of online businesses. The type of business we see consistently is the dining establishment, and their need for content is immense.

Fashion Photographer Sets His Eye On Food

If you have ever wanted to frustrate yourself as a photographer, try shooting food and actually make it look appetizing. Edward Gowans, a photographer based out of Portland Oregon, has made a living shooting food for almost 20 years. Edward learned there was a big market in the northwest looking for stylized culinary images. Using the lighting knowledge he gained from shooting fashion models, Edward began creating stylized culinary images for his clients. As you can see in this video, some of his setups are pretty extensive and sometimes take full days to design. With food, the light often needs to be scrimmed, flagged, and reflected perfectly to showcase both the textures and colors of a well plated dish. Check out more of Ed's work in his portfolio here.
How to Use Dry Ice to Make an Epic Product Commercial

Adding special effects to shots can turn a nice but rather plain image into something truly memorable. In this video, what behind-the-scenes as a commercial is made for a brand of flash-frozen coffee using dry ice.

A Beginners’ Guide to Choosing the Right Tripod for Food Photography

With a bewildering array of tripods available, it can be a challenge as a new photographer to figure out what sort of tripod will best suit your work, a choice that’s made all the more stressful when you realize just how expensive tripods can be. This in-depth guide will definitely help.

Take a Tour of My Cooking Shoot

I recently shot some cooking tutorials. They were budget-friendly, easy to follow, and there were 50 of them. Here’s how we did it.

Kim Krejca Explains The Importance Of Food Styling

Kim Krejca is a professional food and prop stylist. Combining her background in art direction and culinary arts, Kim now works with photographers to create the perfect images you see on menus and in maganzines. Most of what you see in terms of food photography is cleverly engineered and often times flat out fake. Kim and food photographer Rick Gayle take you behind the camera to discover some of the tools they use during their stylings. If you enjoy this video, be sure to head over to Adorama's learning center to watch more videos. /center>
Hennessy Campaign Shot With Light Painting

I have a few blogs that I go to each day. Today both Gizmodo and Strobist had posts about this video. This is exactly what Fstoppers is all about! /center>
Celebrated Food Photog Marcus Nilsson Dishes on Shooting On-Camera Flash, Tilt-Shift Lenses, and Why He Hates Sandwiches

Marcus Nilsson thinks outside the box. A former chef, Nilsson stumbled into food photography and ended up being one of the photographers who shaped our contemporary approach to cuisine. Today, Nilsson is still pushing that envelope (with on-camera flash, what?!), and regularly works for some of the world’s top foodie magazines, including Bon Appetit, Food & Wine, Martha Stewart Living, Details, Esquire, Everyday with Rachael Ray, the Food Network, GQ, and Travel+Leisure. Check out the full FS Spotlight interview below, where Nilsson dishes on shooting on-camera flash, tilt-shift lenses, crazy Mexican market foods, and why he hates sandwiches.