Would You Cool Down Your Canon R5 With This $165 Fan?

A few months after a $400 modification emerged to cool down your Canon EOS R5, there’s now another solution: a purpose-built fan that attaches to the back of the camera to help dissipate heat.

Chinese company Tilta has recently released the Tiltaing Cooling System, a fan that attaches to the back of R5 and R6 cameras, which the company claims will offer “full range cooling, efficient and stable” that will “support your creative vision.” The seven-blade fan runs at 5,000 rpm and produces 30 dB of noise. The system has a slower, quieter fan speed available, but details are not published.

The fan sits in the area left by the folded-out LCD and is held in place via an ARCA baseplate. Alternatively, it can be integrated into one of Tilta’s cages. It appears that being hinged, the fan can be flipped down in the event that you wish to fold the LCD back in. The device is powered via its USB-C port, and you’ll need to rig your own supply.

As pointed out by Canon News, there are no details on how the Tiltaing Cooling System improves performance, and as yet, there are no reviews available.

Is this cooling rig worth investigating? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

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29 Comments

J.d. Davis's picture

Why would you purchase a camera with such a hideous design flaw?

Marc F's picture

People are used to purchase laptop computers that have the exact same flaw, and place fans below them…

J.d. Davis's picture

Not really that much into pain thanks!

Benoit Pigeon's picture

This is like encouraging and accepting companies selling unfinished, defective products in the future. Such a backward step. Last back I used with a cooling system was the DCB2 but that was a model first introduced in 1995!

Marc F's picture

That’s what people are doing but not me. I never bought a laptop computer, and I would never buy a plastic camera. I hate plastic.

Benoit Pigeon's picture

Plastic camera? You really don't make any sense. Nice!

Christian Fiore's picture

The camera is all metal...

Christian Fiore's picture

Laptops have vents. 99.9% of photo cameras do not. Fans won't do much without a proper way to channel the heat out of the body first. Which Canon gimped.

David Stephen Kalonick's picture

Pretty sure people that purchase this camera are photographers.

J.d. Davis's picture

Equally certain they have too much money and enjoy pain!

David Stephen Kalonick's picture

The fuck?

J.d. Davis's picture

If it needs a fan it's too hot to handle & it costs 165 bucks. The R5 is almost 4 grand just for the body - right?

Not to mention it's big and fugly!

David Stephen Kalonick's picture

It doesn't need this fan. That's a 3rd party product. I'm a photographer that uses this camera with no heating issues. $3800 for an amazing camera(the best I've used in over 20 years of shooting)isn't a concern. I'm making 4-7k a wedding and 2-10k a commercial event. I'll use this camera for at least 3 years if not 4.The ROI is worth it and it will most likely sell for 2k in 3-4 years. So $1800 for a brilliant camera system doesn't need your 8th grade opinion on cost or winning a beauty contest. Are you even a photographer?

Benoit Pigeon's picture

Can you clarify, do you mean still photographers, "multimedia people" or videographers.

David Stephen Kalonick's picture

Yes. Still photography. I dabble in video and do some DP work. But those jobs require rental equipment. I wouldn't use any mirrorless or DSLR for those jobs.

Michael Krueger's picture

Knowing this camera has such an extreme limit to video because of over heating I would never buy it for the purpose of video which would negate the need for the fan.

Lawrence Huber's picture

Get the external recorder.
And if I were doing real video I would get a real video camera.
This i a phenomenal stills camera that no other comes close to yet for the price.
Throw in some video for fun and you have a camera no one else comes close to.
No I would not waste money on the gimmick.
Looks like some garbage you would hook up to a Sony and not a real camera.

Yin Ze's picture

Lol you do not need this contraption on the Sony. I have shot a lot of 8k on a1. Im currently in 90 plus degree environment and the camera has not let me down on extended shooting in 8k. It does get pretty warm
On the grip area when shooting handheld.

Christian Fiore's picture

Well sorry, but the "real" camera is overheating, and the Sony is still recording indefinitely.

dale clark's picture

If you regularly shoot videos that go beyond the "safe" time of the camera's heat limit, look for a video centered camera. Most people who purchase the R5 will be photo centric first. This would be like a heavy photo user purchasing the Blackmagic 6k pro for photos. The capability is there, just not for the heavy photo user

Martin Mitchell's picture

At $3900 it should work flawlessly. The major camera companies are trying too hard to top each other. The market is over saturated with too many camera models. How many Sony A cameras are there now?

John Nixon's picture

😂😂😂😂😂
But seriously, buy something that does what you need. Everything has a weakness. Nothing is more irritating than people who don’t own a particular piece of kit whining about what it won’t do.

Benoit Pigeon's picture

A weakness? RAW 8K was the selling hot point for that camera a year ago until Canon presto revised their advertising.

Christian Fiore's picture

Canon advertised that this could be used on professional video sets. People DID buy something that was supposed to do what they needed. But it didn't. False advertising.

Daniel Watkins's picture

I use the R5 with an external monitor and normally have the rig and the other components like a sound recorder and so all running off a Vmount. I can shoot 8k 30 and burn through the vmount battery before I even get a warning. When I use the R5 with my external recorder and no vmount and just the battery grip with 2 x nh batteries I run out of battery before I get any kind of warning in 8k 30 and 4k fine. If I don't use an external monitor then I get a warning in 8k 30 and 4k fine around the 32 mins continuous mark but it goes on till around 43 mins if I ignore it.

Similarly, if I use my A1 for 8k without an external monitor I get about 50 mins before a shutdown and if I use a vmount I normally run out of card space before any warning.

This is in Sweden so it's not blistering hot but it's pretty damn toasty at the mo.

When I'm shooting for a client I always use my rig with either camera and they both do what I need flawlessly. This fan is absolutely pointless for most people. Get an external monitor and a vmount and all your overheating concerns on either system will be gone (if you shoot for extended periods of time it's worth every penny).

Mike Ditz's picture

Why are you coming into a perfectly good online argument with real world experience and facts! :^D

Christian Fiore's picture

So you're saying the camera can't do what it's supposed to do by itself, without adding a lot of other expensive stuff? Hard pass.

Daniel Watkins's picture

Sorry for the late response I rarely look at this website anymore. Well for me I always add the 'stuff' anyway. For instance, my RED is completely useless without additions that cost thousands, and at an absolute minimum, I need a monitor and power additions for it. My Sony A1 and my R5 will do me gorgeous looking 4k straight out of the camera no problem without adding anything and they will both do 8k without any additions but they will shut down. Expensive additions just make the user experience vastly better, pretty much the same for most things, do you need to buy them to have the camera do what it is supposed to? absolutely not.

David Stephen Kalonick's picture

I can't remember a time I was on a set where they used a mirrorless camera, ever, 0, rarely happening. To all you Sony trolls, please stop the bragging, it's embarrassing.