Origin: Maintaining Photographic Style Across Genres

Being a creative professional, in my experience, is about harnessing this constant need to create. It’s almost as if there’s a little creature inside which comes up with little ideas and if I don’t act on at least some of them, they’ll bubble over and die — leaving behind awful regret and emptiness.

Sorry, that got a bit dark a bit fast. My point is, no one really tells creatives to make things, we just kind of do it. And we’re always trying new ways of approaching the world around us.

Vadim submitted some of his work via the Fstoppers suggestions (and yes — we writers do read those!) Much of his work is beautifully constructed landscapes in natural and built environments.

What resonated with me, was his pivot in practice to stylized abstract forms; the essence of his style still holds in this video, but the subject of his video is very different from his usual images of grand landscapes. In Origin, Vadim uses simple household objects including paints, alcohols, and surfactants to create stunningly beautiful microcosms of color and light. The visuals and sound coordinate beautifully, but what stands out is how true they are to Vadim’s style. Even though the subject is very different and I’m sure the techniques used to create the work are too, his visual language resonates through both the macro and micro-videos. His oeuvre, with the inclusion of micro videography, succinctly illustrates this idea of a creative’s visual style.

In the comments, I’d love to know if you’ve ever had to drastically change your subject matter from what you usually work with to something else and how that turned out for you?

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